Temperature

  • Temperature (sometimes called thermodynamic temperature) is a measure of the average kinetic energy of the particles in a system. Adding heat to a system causes its temperature to rise.

Thermochemistry

  • Thermochemistry is the study of the heat energy associated with chemical reactions and/or physical transformations. A reaction may release or absorb energy, and a phase change may do the same, such as in melting and boiling.

Energy

  • The capacity for doing work. It may exist in potential, kinetic, thermal, electrical, chemical, nuclear, or other various forms. There are, moreover, heat and work—i.e., energy in the process of transfer from one body to another.

Entropy

  • Entropy, the measure of a system’s thermal energy per unit temperature that is unavailable for doing useful work. Because work is obtained from ordered molecular motion, the amount of entropy is also a measure of the molecular disorder, or randomness, of a system.

Heat

  • Heat is a form of energy that can be transferred from one object to another or even created at the expense of the loss of other forms of energy.

Heat Capacity

  • It is the amount of heat required to change its temperature by one degree, and has units of energy per degree.
  • Heat capacity C is how much energy is required per unit temperature.

Heat Transfer

  • Heat transfer is the process of transfer of heat from high temperature reservoir to low temperature reservoir.
  • Heat can be transferred by conduction, convection and radiation

Pressure-Volume Diagrams

  • It is used to describe corresponding changes in volume and pressure in a system. They are commonly used in thermodynamics, cardiovascular physiology, and respiratory physiology.

Thermodynamic System

  • A thermodynamic system is a group of material and/or radiative contents. Its properties may be described by thermodynamic state variables such as temperature, entropy, internal energy, and pressure.

Adiabatic process

  • An adiabatic process occurs without transfer of heat or mass of substances between a thermodynamic system and its surroundings. In an adiabatic process, energy is transferred to the surroundings only as work.

Enthalpy

  • Enthalpy, a property of a thermodynamic system, is equal to the system’s internal energy plus the product of its pressure and volume. In a system enclosed so as to prevent mass transfer, for processes at constant pressure, the heat absorbed or released equals the change in enthalpy.

Hess’s Law

  • Hess’s Law of Constant Heat Summation (or just Hess’s Law) states that regardless of the multiple stages or steps of a reaction, the total enthalpy change for the reaction is the sum of all changes.

Gibbs Free Energy

  • The Gibbs free energy is a thermodynamic potential that can be used to calculate the maximum of reversible work that may be performed by a thermodynamic system at a constant temperature and pressure.

Coefficient of Thermal Expansion

  • The coefficient of thermal expansion describes how the size of an object changes with a change in temperature. Specifically, it measures the fractional change in size per degree change in temperature at a constant pressure.

Phase Diagram

  • A phase diagram is a graph showing the limiting conditions for solid, liquid, and gaseous phases of a single substance or of a mixture of substances while undergoing changes in pressure and temperature or in some other combination of variables, such as solubility and temperature.